Sunday, 27 April 2014

24 Best Albums of 2013: #10 to #1

You can read the previous two parts of my Best Albums of 2013 list here. 

10. Iron & Wine – Ghost on Ghost
Ghost on Ghost is in some sense a continuation of the adult-alternative sound Sam Beam cultivated on his previous records The Shepherd’s Dog and Kiss Each Other Clean, but it also calls to mind the rawer, more acoustic work for which he first gained renown. Songs like “Grace for Saints and Ramblers” and “Lovers’ Revolution” are vibrant and passionate, full of detail without feeling overcrowded. Others, such as “Low Light Buddy of Mine,” so perfectly evoke the atmosphere and intimacy of a late-night jazz club that you can almost smell the cigarette smoke rising from ashtrays.



9. Beyoncé Beyoncé
I tend to like and admire Beyonce’s music rather than actively love it; individual songs have grabbed me in the past, but her records have been too uneven as a whole. Therefore, I was surprised to find that this record, which Beyonce refreshingly declared should be listened to as an album and not as an iTunes playlist, was a remarkably cohesive and rewarding work. Even in its lesser moments, Beyonce is still exciting and engaging.



8. Neko Case – The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You
The Worse Things Get is Neko Case’s most challenging record – it forces the listener to reconsider their idea of who Case is and the music she makes. Those expecting an album’s worth of fist-pumping anthems will be disappointed. Those who know the full extent of Case’s range will find an album full of piercing insights and irresistible lyrical collages.




7. London Grammar – If You Wait
I hadn’t heard of London Grammar until I read a glowing review of If You Wait on a pop culture website I greatly respect, so I had high expectations of the band’s debut, and wasn’t disappointed. London Grammar – Dot Major, Hannah Reid and Dan Rothman – have crafted an album that stands among such records as Stars’ Set Yourself On Fire as a chronicle of what one article about the band called the “quarter-life crisis.” If You Wait is more accomplished than its peers, however, and its best songs, including “Strong” and the astonishing “Wasting My Young Years,” achieve a remarkable sort of timelessness.



6. Haim – Days Are Gone
There’s no doubt that Haim owes a substantial debt to Fleetwood Mac and The Eagles among others, but Days Are Gone manages to wear its influences on its sleeves without coming across as mere pastiche. It's impossible to know whether we'll be talking about Days Are Gone a year from now, but if “Falling,” the sophisticated kiss-off “Honey & I” and the impeccable pop of “Don’t Save Me” are any indication, we’ll still be talking about Haim.



Head below the fold for albums #5 to #1.